Our delivery technology allows the incorporation of virtually any drug into lipid nanoparticles.

 

 
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Drug delivery systems are carefully designed technologies for targeted transport of drugs to their sites of action as well as their release in a controlled manner. 

Advances in drug discovery and genomic research have led to many promising drugs or bioactive agents that have great potential in improving disease treatment and human health. Despite this progress, however, many of these agents have undesirable side effects from their interaction with normal tissues, or are unable to reach their cellular destination due to their inability to enter diseased cells.

Delivery systems such as lipid nanoparticles can be systemically engineered to provide a stable, protective vehicle, which preferentially accumulates in tumours and sites of inflammation, enters cells efficiently, and releases the encapsulated agents inside the cells. As a result, the drugs are safer and more effective.

Integrated Nanotherapeutics designs and produces biocompatible lipid nanoparticle delivery systems to enable the potential of therapeutics and diagnostics.

 

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Many valuable therapeutic or diagnostic agents fail during development stages or clinical trials because they are often too toxic to normal tissues. Although they can be proven to be effective, their benefits cannot outweigh the risks of their use in animals or humans. 

The delivery system approach can be used to mitigate issues of toxicity; however, not all agents possess the appropriate chemical and physical properties to be efficiently incorporated into lipid nanoparticle delivery systems. 

Leveraging chemistry, biochemistry and biophysics, as well as lipid nanoparticle delivery systems, our technologies produce therapeutic and diagnostic compounds with distinct and preferred properties that ensure multi-functional benefits.

Our development pipeline includes agents that can be used in the treatment of inflammatory diseases and cancer